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Full text of "Choice recipes [microform] : how to use Fleischmann's compressed yeast"

*: 



i^!^PL.!^;fj'^TS OF 



Fi.H Inch MANN & Co. 

Toronto 



Choice Recipes. 



FLEISCHMANN <& CO. 

ORIGINAL MANUFACTURERS, 
INTRODUCERS AND DISTRIBUTERS OF 

COMPRESSED YEAST 

IN THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA. 



THESE BOOKLETS WILL BE MAILED TO ANY 
PART OF THE UNITED STATES AND THE 
CANADAS ON RECEIPT OF NAME AND 2 CENT 
STAMP. 

ADDRESS FLEISCHMANN & CO., PERRY and 
WASHINGTON STREETS, NEW-YORK CITY. 



OB 



FIETSCHMANN & ro,, 

183 ADELAIDE ST. W,, 
TOROI^TO. 



Choice Recipes 



HOW TO USE 
FLEISCHMANN'S COMPRESSED 

YEAST 



ORIGINATED AND SELECTED BY 

ELEANOR KIRK 



Copyrighted, 1889, by 
Fleischmann & Co. 



C. J0URGEN8EN, 96 A 98 MAIDEN LANE, NEW*VORK. 



INDEX. 

PACK. 

Preface 5 

A Talk About Bread-Making 7 

Selection of Flour 9 

Wheat Bread 9 

Concord Bread ^° 

Bran Bread ^ ^ 

Brown Bread * ' 

Brown Bread Toast '2 

Buttermilk Bread. . ^3 

Graham Bread ^3 

Milk Bread. ^3 

Potato Bread H 

Rye Bread ^ 

Risen Corn Bread H 

Biscuits ^4- 

French Rolls ^5 

Tea Rolls '5 

Mixed Biscuits ^^ 

Middlings Biscuits ^^ 

Anti-Dyspeptic Biscuits ^6 

Rye Biscuits ^7 

Popular Puffs ^7 

Squirrels' Tails ^7 

Hot Cross Buns *^ 

" The Martha's Vineyard Bun " i8 

Sally Lunn ^9 

Children's Rusk ^9 

3 



PACE. 

Wafflf.s 19 

liUCKWUKAT Cakks 20 

Corn-Mkai, Flapjacks 20 

Flannkk Carks 21 

WHKAT MtFFINS 21 

Drop Miffins 21 

(iRANDMA's Muffins 21 

(".RAHA.M Muffins 22 

CkUMFFis 22 

I\\RCH CAKKS 22 

Doughnuts 23 

S'i'RAWKFRRY OR RaSPHKRRV SHORT-CAKF. (No. i) 23 

Strawukrry Shori-cakk (No. 2) 23 

Imperial Jumblf:s 24 

Nut Cak.1' 24 

Bread Cake 25 

Spiced Cake 25 

Gold Cake 25 

i'XECTioN Cake 25 

Christmas Cakes 26 

Auntie's Cookies 26 

Risen Angkl-Cake 26 

Batter Pudding 27 

Peach Pot-Pie 27 

Suet Pudding 28 

Berry Roly-Polv 28 

Pie-Crus r 28 

Hard Sauce 29 

Cream Sauce 29 

Mugwump Sauce 29 

Clam Pot-Pie 30 

Root Beer 31 

4 






PREFACE. 

H I'', signs of the times arc certainly evident to those who 
^: use their eyes and their ears. That we are tencHng to 
^•j common-sense in matters pertaining to the welfare of 
our bodies is universally admitted. How shall I best jjro- 
mote the health of my family ? the prudent mother and 
housekeeper now inquires. What shall my children eat, and 
in what way shall they be clothed, in order to insure good 
appetites, good digestion, and sound nerves ? Wasp-waists 
are no longer fashionable, and the gid with a delicate appe- 
tite and super-sensitive sensibilities is not an object of admira- 
tion. It is no longer a sign of superior refinement for a 
woman o faint easil\-. The girl wlio is not able to walk 
a few miles with ease, run, if need be, climb fences and 
row a boat, is regarded with commiseration. She may read 
Cicero, converse in Parisian French and pretend to Browning, 
but she is not an agreeable companion for healthy, vigorous 
young folks. The tide of public opinion has set strongly 
against unnecessary invalidism ; and while there is just as 
much sympathy in the world for the weakness and the ills 
that are unavoidable, there is a growing determination to 
eliminate as m.any of the causes of disease as possible. The 
tests of analysis to which the component articles of food 

6 



have l)Cfn subjected for the past few years prove the great 
interest taken in tlie sul)ject of health. 

'J'he kitchen has been called " the stomach of the house," 
and now people begin to understand that the stomach is the 
kitchen of the l)o(ly,and if this room is in disorder, all the other 
departments of the human establishment must necessarily suf- 
fer. We know that health and poor digestion cannot exist 
in the same organism, and we also know that when our food 
is i)roperly digested and assimilated disease is only possible 
where there are other and local causes. We know again that 
there is no such thing as the proper digestion and assimilation 
of improperly cooked food. Pure material, hygienically pre- 
pared and partaken of in reason, cannot fail to produce both 
mental and physical vigor. It is with the desire to assist in 
this good work that the following recipes, all of them simple, 
practical, and thoroughly tested, are given to the world. 

There is less intelligence shown in the preparation of bread- 
stuffs than in any other department of cookery. Meats and 
vegetables can be rendered very unpalatable by improper 
cooking, but they cannot be made so dangerously indigesti- 
ble as the bread and the biscuits and the cakes which form 
so large a part of the food we eat. 

The most of the recipes given in this little volume are safe 
even for those whose digestions are impaired. Those con- 
taining fruits and spices are not, however, recommended for 
dyspeptics, but for the stomachs that have been sufficiently 
well cared for to bear a generous and varied diet. 



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A TALK ABOUT BREAD-MAKING. 

ISnrHKkK is nothinijj in the whole realm of cookery so rare 



7( 



[^1 as good bread, and strangely enough there is nothing 
.^J in the world so easy to make. The process is sim- 
plicity itself. The principal recpiisites are good tlour and 
yeast that can be thoroughly depended upon. 'Inhere are i)er- 
haps a few old housekeepers who, through a long and labori- 
ous experience, have learned to make yeast that will i^cneraZ/y 
produce desirable results ; but this is accomplished by a waste- 
ful expenditure of time and nerve force. A rise or a fall of 
temperature is sure to disturb the perfect conditions necessary 
to the evolution of the model loaf; so the housekeeper finds 
that " eternal vigilance is the price " of good bread. Very 
litde necessity now exists for the domestic manufacture of 
yeast. Fleischmann's Compressed Yeast is to be found almost 
everywhere, and is as reliable as it is compact and handy. 
The grocers in all of our principal cides, towns, and villages are 
supplied with fresh yeast daily, and the yeast that is left over 
is gathered up by the company, in order to insure against the 
sale of anything less than perfect. Should a housekeeper have 
a cake that she is in doubt about, she need test it only with a 

7 



finger and thumb. If it is good, it will be firm. If unfit for 
use, it will dent easily. 

In this connection it will be well to call attention to the 
yellow label which is placed upon every Cuke of this Com- 
pressed Yeast. A glance will suffice to see if Fleischmann's 
name is duly inscribed thereupon. If it is, the cook can go 
ahead, with the conviction that success will crown her efforts. 

A lady incjuiring about the proper proportions of yeast and 
flour wrote, that she thought '• the whole of a Fleischmann's 
Compressed Yeast Cake was too much for two quarts of flour," 
as her dough became so light that it soured. A whole yeast 
cake might possibly be too much for two quarts of flour in the 
summer, when the sponge is set early in the evening, but it 
could hardly be so in winter. The condition spoken of is 
more likely to result from the dough standing too long before 
baking, than from too much yeast, though in this matter good 
judgment is \ery necessary. A Fleischmann's Compressed Yeast 
Cake is not too much for two (juarts of flour, if mixed late in the 
evening and remolded and baked early in the morning. Or, if 
more convenient, it can be mixed immediately after breakfast 
and baked in the afternoon. This is the best plan for a begin- 
ner, provided the oven can be trusted in the latter part of the 
day, because the dough can then be carefully watched. 

It takes some judgment and experience to tell when dough 
has arrived at the correct raising point. But if the bread is 
properly put together, and in summer is lightly covered 
and kept in a moderately warm place, and in winter is 

8 



well tucked up and kej^t I'rom a chill, it will be ready to remix 
early in the morning. It is always best for novices to go 
entirely by rule. After making bread a few times the cook 
will become familiar with the a^jpearance of the dough, and 
can then safely vary the time, and try any other experiments 
that her ingenuity and love of variety may suggest. But let 
not the young cook go to the work with a premonition of evil. 
" Faint heart " is as dangerous in bread-making as in courtship. 
With sleeves rolled back, a clean apron, and a bold, calm front, 
let the novice approach the fliour barrel. " There is no such 
word as fail " for those who determine to succeed. 

SELECTION OF FLOUR. 

In buying flour alwa'^s avoid that which is powdery and 
unable to retain the form given it by a firm pressure of the 
hand. The top of a barrel of flour will often bear this test, 
when half a foot down it would be as impossible to give it a 
shape with the hand as it would be to bunch the powdered 
dust of the street. For this reason some housekeepers, who 
have been cheated a few times in this manner, insist upon 
testing the flour at the other end of the barrel. 

There are many recipes for bread-making, bat the following 
is easy, economical, and unfailing ; therefore the very best one 
for a beginner. 

WHEAT BREAD. 

To three quarts of sifted flour, add a great spoonful of salt 
and a teaspoonful of sugar. Dissolve a Fleischmann's Yeast 



Cake in half a cup of warm water, and with the necessary 
mixing-fluid — warm milk or water — work into form, and 
knead until the dough does not cleave to the molding-board. 
Cover carefully, and set in a warm place to rise. In the morn- 
ing, knead again, make into loaves, and when very light bake 
in a moderate oven from three-quarters of an hour to an hour. 
If the cook prefers bread a litde short instead of spongy, let 
her rub a teaspoonful of lard into the flour before adding the 
yeast. This is entirely a matter of taste. Also, let the cook 
remember that while a Fleischmann's Compressed Yeast Cake is 
not too much for two quarts of flour, it is sufficient for three 
quarts if mixed over night with warm milk or water, and 
placed in a warm place to rise. Bread mixed with milk does 
not keep moist so long as that mixed with water, but it is 
richer and more nourishing. Housekeepers who make bread 
only once a week would do well to use warm water for the 
purpose. 

CONCORD BREAD. 

The recipe for the far-famed Concord Bread is as follows. 

This rule is more elaborate than the preceding one and 
takes more time, but the results are excellent. 

Use one quart of milk, lard the size of an egg, or, what is 
its equivalent in actual measurement, a rounded tablespoonful, 
two quarts of flour, one of them even, the other a heaping 
quart ; one cake of Fleischmann's Compressed Yeast, a heaping 
teaspoonful of salt, and an even teaspoonful of white sugar. 
Dissolve the yeast, salt, and sugar in a very litde tepid water, 
just as little as possible ; scald the lard in the milk, and when 

10 



cool, add to the yeast, and stir in the flour to make a rather 
stiff dough, but do not knead. Let it rise over night ; in the 
morning, the very first thing, stir it down, and when il is risen 
again do not knead, but shake with the flour on the board, 
take out the dough and work with the hands just enough to make 
it smooth and free from the flour ; put into the pans to rise 
again, and bake from thirty to forty minutes, according to the 
size of the loaves, having the oven very hot when the bread is 
first put in. 

BRAN BREAD. 

Two cups of rye meal, one cup of brown sugar, three cups 
of Indian meal, a small handful of salt ; mix into a soft batter 
with warm milk, into which a Fleischmann's Compressed Yeast 
Cake has been dissolved. Do this over night. In the morning, 
place in a carefully buttered pan and set to rise again. The loaf 
should be covered while baking in order to keep the crust from 
hardening. 

BROWN BREAD. 

Brown bread is considered especially difficult to make, even 
by good cooks, but, like wheat bread, the process is perfectly 
simple. Brown bread requires long baking, and as the ten- 
dency of brown bread is toward a thick crust, the oven should 
be only moderately heated. The loaf should be carefully cov- 
ered, and with a deep vessel that will not interfere with the 
rising. Four hours is none too long for the baking. It is more 
w^ork to steam brown bread, but by so doing all danger of a 
thick crust is avoided, as the whole loaf is sure to be more moist. 

11 



One of llu; principal causes ot failure in making brown bread 
is to be ft)un(l in the use of rye liour instead of rye meal. Rye 
flour is too rtnc and makes a ]i)asty mixture, which is very un- 
desirable. Neither is the finely bolted Indian meal the best for 
this purpose. I'wo cups or two bowls of white meal to one cup 
or one bowl of rye meal is about the proper proportion. P'or a 
small family, two coffee-cups of white or yellow Indian meal 
antl one of rye meal will be sufficient. Add to these a teacup 
of Graham flour, a cui) of molasses, and warm milk enough to 
make a soft batter. Dissolve a Fleischmann's Compressed 
Yeast Cake in some warm water, and stir well into the mixture. 
Add a great spoonful of salt, l^ct it rise over night. In the 
morning sdr briskly, and pour into a pan cfr steamer, and let it 
rise again. Steam frcm three to four hours. 

BROWN BREAD TOAST. 

Comparatively few ])ersons are aware of the deliciousness 
of brown bread toast. It is exceedingly appetizing and easily 
digested. But the brown bread which produces nice toast is 
made quite differently from the usual kind. Take one cup of 
wheat flour, one cup of rye meal, one cup of yellow corn meal, 
one teaspoonful of salt, three tablespoonfuls of sugar, and a 
Fleischmann's Compressed Yeast Cake, dissolved in a little 
warm water. Mix with milk which has been scalded and 
cooled until it is of the right consistency to shape ; when 
light, put into pans ; let it rise again, and bake one hour. The 
next day it can be sliced and toasted. Make a cream gravy 
and serve hot. 

12 



BUTTERMILK BREAD. 

Sift enough ;3our into a quart of hot buttermilk to make a 
thick batter; add a Flcischmann's Yeast Cake which has 
been dissolved in warm water, and set to rise. When Hght, 
work in half a teaspoonful of soda which has been dissolveil 
thoroughly in a great spoonful of warm water. Add flour 
enough to work over without stickiness. After rising the 
second time, make into loaves and bake slowly. 

GRAHAM BREAD. 

Onk-third as much wheat flour as Graham is the proper 
proportions for Graham bread and also for Graham biscuit. 
To six cups of Graham flour add two cups of wheat flour, one 
tablespoonful of lard, one even teaspoonful of salt, one cup or 
a half cup of molasses, according to the taste of the family. 
Dissolve a Fleischmann's Yeast Cake in a little warm water, 
add warm milk enough to make a moderately firm dough. 
Mix well, and set to rise. When light, place in pans, let rise 
again, and bake in a slow oven. 

MILK BREAD. 

To a quart of warm new milk add a Fleischmann's Yeast 
Cake which has been dissolved in a little warm water, and a 
great spoonful of melted butter. Stir into this a pint of sifted 
flour and a dessert-spoonful of sugar. Beat well, and set to 
rise. When light, work in flour enough to make a firm dough. 
Raise again, place in pans ; raise again, and bake in a moder- 
ately slow 3ven. 

18 



POTATO BREAD. 

Mash half a dozen potatoes very fine. Add a great spoon- 
ful of melted butter, two cups of warm milk, a teaspoonful of 
salt, and a teaspoonful of sugar. Dissolve a Fleischmann's Yeast 
Cake in warm water, and sift in flour enough to make a mod- 
erately stiff batter. Mix well, and set to rise. When light, put 
into pans and raise again. Bake slowly. 

RYE BREAD. 

A HEAPING quart of rye flour, and a scant pint of wheat flour, 
a small handful of salt, an even great spoonful of butter or lard, 
and half a cup of molasses or sugar. Dissolve a Fleischmann's 
Yeast Cake in warm milk enough to make a good dough. 
Knead for several minutes, and set to rise. In the morning 
knead, put into pans and raise the second time. Bake an hour. 

RISEN CORN BREAD. 

Dissolve half of a Fleischmann's Yeast Cake in a little 
warm water, and add milk enough to make a soft batter of 
two cups of Indian meal -— white or yellow — and one cup of 
sifted wheat flour. Use half a teaspoonful of salt. When light, 
stir in three eggs, the whites and yolks beaten separately, a 
scant cup of sugar, and a spoonful of melted butter. Set to rise 
again, and when light, bake in large pans or patty pans. 

BISCUITS. 

Bread and biscuits can be mixed at the same time, and 
thus save time and labor by making a little larger batch. In 

14 



the morning take enough of the hght dough to make as many 
biscuits as are necessary. To a (juart bowl of dough add a 
heaping great spoonful of butter. Work in well, sifting in 
a little more Hour if necessary. Do not roll out, but make 
into small biscuits with the hantls, and set in warm place to 
rise. Cover with a bread cloth, and when very light bake in 
aciuickoven. pRENCH ROLLS. 

Much inquiry has been made for a rule for tender French 
rolls with a brittle crust. One must have rich warm milk to 
begin with. The flour must be the whitest and best procurable. 
To a quart of sifted flour add a generous half-cup of sweet 
butter, a little more than half of a Fleischmann's Yeast Cake 
dissolved in warm milk, and a great spoonful of powdered 
sugar. This dough requires considerable kneading. Set to 
rise in a warm place. In the morning remould, adding the 
whites of two eggs beaten to a froth. Make into oblong rolls, 
let them rise again, and bake in quick oven. 

TEA ROLLS. 

Two quarts of sifted flour, a Fleischmann's Yeast Cake dis- 
solved in warm milk, a little salt, t>v-o great spoonfuls of 
powdered sugar, two-thirds of a cup of butter, and warm 
milk enough to make a soft dough. Set to rise immediately 
after breakfast; an hour or more before tea beat the whites 
of two eggs to a stiff froth, work in carefuUy; then make into 
rolls and set to rise again. Twenty minutes to half an hour in 
a quick oven will be sufficient. 

16 



MIXED BISCUITS. 

One-third rye Hour, one-third Graham, and one-third wheat 
middHngs. Add a Hltle salt, . tablespoonful of sugar, and a 
tablespoonful of butter. Mix with warm milk, into which a 
Fleischmann's Yeast Cake has been dissolved. Knead thor- 
oughly, set to rise over night, knead well again in the morning 
and make into biscuits. Raise the second time and bake in a 
moderate oven. Loaves made in the same way are as digest- 
ible as they are palatable. 

MIDDLINGS BISCUITS. 

Boil one quart of milk, and when pardy cool, add a litde 
salt and two spoonfuls of sugar. Dissolve a Fleischmann's 
Yeast Cake in a little warm water, and stir in enough mid- 
dlings to make a soft batter. In the morning, add two eggs 
well-beaten, and sifted flour enough to make a moderately firm 
dough. Place in pans and let rise until light. Bake in a quick 

oven. 

ANTI-DYSPEPTIC BISCUITS. 

The following recipe and remarks are from "Aunt Annie," 

the famous Vermont housekeeper. She says: "I have made 

these biscuits many a time for poor, half-starved creatures who 

had not been able to digest even the simplest food for weeks, 

and I have never yet seen the person who had the sHghtest 

trouble in taking care of them. Milk, you know, is the rankest 

poison to some stomachs, and there is no milk in these biscuits, 

and very litde of what I call * pulp,' or ' wads of dough.' Sift 

a quart of flour two or three times, into which a teaspoonful 

16 



of salt has been thrown. Take a piece of butter the si/e of 
an egg and rub well into the Hour. Then dissolve the larger 
half of a Fleischmann's Yeast Cake in a little tepid water, and 
.stir in ; add cold water enough to make a soft dough. Roll to 
thin cookie thickness and cut out. Place two together, sepa- 
rating only by tiny pieces of butter. Bake a rich brown in a 
pretty hot oven. 1 will guarantee them to be crisp, delicious 

and digestible." 

RYE BISCUITS. 

Two cups of rye flour, one cup of wheat flour, a great 

spoonful of sugar, a little salt. Dissolve a Fleischmann's 

Yeast Cake in a litde warm water; add to this enough flour 

to make a soft batter. Mix over night or early in morning. 

When light, remould, place in pans and let rise again. 

POPULAR PUFFS. 

A PINT of flour and a pinch of salt, sifted twice. Rub a 
half a teacup of butter into the flour, and add part of a 
Fleischmann's Yeast Cake that has been dissolved in a little 
warm water. Mix to a soft batter with warm milk. Set to 
rise. When light, add the whites of three eggs beaten to a stiff" 
froth, and a great spoonful of granulated sugar. Stir briskly, 
and bake in p itty pans in hot oven. These are delicious. 

SQUIRRELS' TAILS. 

This is a comparatively new delicacy, and was first made by 
an ingenious lady of Providence, R. I., from which place 
many novel and delicious recipes have come. 

17 



To a (juart of flour that lias been twice sifted, add a little 
salt, a piece of butler the si/e of an egg, then rub well into the 
flour. Dissuive half a i'lcisc:hmann's Yeast Cake in a little 
warm water, and add to this warm milk enough to make a 
moderately soft baiter. Do not s])are the kneading. Set to 
rise. W'licn li^hl, add the whites of two eggs that have been 
beaten to a stiff froth. Let rise again. Make a sauce of one 
cup of granulated sugar, and half a cup of butter. Beat until 
white and creamy. Roll the dough out thin, cut in strips 
about an inch and a half wide and six inches long, and spread 
the sauce upon them. Roll each strip up separately, place in 
pan, let rise again, and bake in a hot oven. 

HOT CROSS BUNS. 

Make a sponge of one pint of sweet milk, wheat flour, a 
little salt, and a Fleischmann's Yeast Cake dissolved in warm 
milk. When light, add a cup of sugar, half a cup of butter, 
and a little cinnamon. Sift in flour enough to roll out. Knead 
well and set to rise again. Roll ato square cakes and make a 
deep cross upon each with a knife, and place in oven. When 
done brush with a feather dipped in the white of an egg which 
has been beaten with sugar. 

"THE MARTHA'S VINEYARD 
BREAKFAST BUN." 

This is a unique delicacy, but why " bun " is hard to tell. 
They are baked in gem pans, and are eaten hot with butter. 
The recipe is as follows : One cup of wheat flour, one cup 

18 



of Graham flour, linlf a cup of rye (lour, two lu-apiii^' spoon- 
fuls of l)uttcr, a little salt, halt" of a Flcischtnann's W-ast Cake 
dissolved in warm water, and enou^Mi milk to make a soft, but 
not " runny " s})onL,'e. Set in warm j)lace to rise over niL,dit. 
In the morning add two eggs well ])eaten, a generous half cuj) 
of sugar, and let stand a few moments. JJake in a ([uiek oven. 

SALLY LUNN. 

Add five well-beaten eggs to two ru[)S of warm milk, and 
two tablespoonfuls of melted butter, a little salt, and a cuj) of 
sugar. Stir in enough sifted Hour to make a soft batter. Set to 
rise. When light, pour into patty i)ans, and bake quickly. 

CHILDREN'S RUSK. 

Make a soft s[)onge of one pint of warm milk, half of a 
P'leischmann's Yeast Cake dissolved in warm water, and 
sifted flour. Let it rise over night. In the morning add 
half a cup of melted butter, one cup of sugar, one egg, 
and a little salt. Flavor with cinnamon. Sift in flour enough 
to make a firm dough. Mold into rolls, place in pans, 
let rise again, and bake in quick oven. These are improved 
by the addition of a few^ cuiTants or raisins. When done, 
dampen the tops slightly and sift on some powdered sugar. 

WAFFLES. 

The best wafile recipe I know of is as follows: If for break- 
fast, mix at night one pint of milk, half a Fleischmann's Yeast 
Cake, and one pint of sifted flour. In the morning add a little 

19 



salt, a lablespoonful of melted butter, two cj^'gs, yolks and whites 
beaten separately. If intended for tea, mix in the morning. 

BUCKWHEAT CAKES. 

At a recent gathering of savants and scientists, buckwheat 
was declared perfectly innocent of the inflammatory principle 
which has so long and vigorously been used against it. \\'hile 
it contains more carbon than wheat, this fact does not detract 
from its favor, as the manufacture of caloric is a blessing with 
the thermometer in the zero neighborhood. Hie testimony of 
workingmen, that a breakfast of buckwheat cakes was better 
to labor on than a meal of meat and potatoes, was carefully 
considered by these scientific in(iuirers after truth. There is 
one infallible rule for perfect cakes, cakes that will not weaken 
or inflame the stomach. Take a quart of warm milk, a little 
salt, a great spoonful of Indian meal, and buckwheat enough 
to make a soft batter. Then dissolve part of a Fleischmann's 
Yeast Cake in a litde warm water and stir in briskly. Cover 
closely, and set in a warm place to rise. In the morning stir 
again, and bake on a hot griddle. 

Eat with butter and maple syrup. 

CORN-MEAL FLAPJACKS. 

Dissolve a Fleischmann's Yeast Cake in a quart of warm 
milk. Add a cupful of Indian meal, a cup of sifted flour, and 
a little salt. In the morning stir in two eggs Hghtly beaten, 
and a little sugar or molasses if sweetness is preferred. Should 
the batter not be thick enough, sift in more flour. Bake on hot 
griddle. 20 



FLANNEL LAKES. 

OSE (|uart of milk, one Flcisihmann's Vcast Cake dissolved 
in warm water, one tablespoonful of melted hutter, three eggs 
well beaten, a little salt, and flour enough for a soft hatter. 
Add the butter and eggs in the morning. JkiVe on a hot 



griddle. 



WHEAT MUFFINS. 

Two (;ui)s of sifted flour, a litUe .salt, a great spoonful of 

sugar, and a great s[joonful of melted butter. Dissolve a 

Fleischmann's Yeast C!ake in a little \yarm water, ami add 

milk enough to make a moderately firm batter. When risen, 

beat three eggs, lightly, and stir in. Jiake in rings and eat 

immediately. 

DROP MUFFINS. 

Take two eggs, well l)caten, one and a half pints of milk or 

water, one great spoonful of butter, one teaspoonful of salt, and 

a Fleischmann's Yeast Cake dissolved in a little warm water. 

Stir enough wheat flour into this mixture to make a good batter. 

In the morning don't stir the batter, l)ut drop it a spoonful at a - 

time in a dripping-pan. Bake in rather a (piick oven for half 

an hour. 

GRANDMA'S MUFFINS. 

Make a batter of one pint of warm milk and wheat tiour. 
Add a little salt and a Fleischmann's Yeast Cake dissolved in a 
little warm water or milk. Set to rise over night. In the morn- 
ing stir in three eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately, and 
half a cup of granulated sugar. Sift in a little more flour, and 



21 



let rise again. \\ hen very light, poir into rings and bake in a 
quick oven. 

GRAHAM MUFFINS. 

To one quart of warm milk add three cups of Graham flour, 
one cup of wheat flour, n little salt, one tablespoonful of butter 
and one of lard, half a cup of sugar. Add a Fleischmann's 
Yeast Cake which has been dissolved in a little warm water, 
and stir well. When light, bake in muflln rings. 

. CRUMPETS. 

One pint of warm milk, two tablespoonfuls of melted but- 
ter, a little salt, and flour enough to make a soft batter. When 
light, pour into patty pans, let rise a few moments, and bake in 
a quick oven. Sweet crumpets are made by addijig a half cup 
of sugar. 

PARCH CAKES. 

One cup of granulated sugar, three-quarters of a cup of milk, 
piece of butter the size of an egg, and two eggs well beaten. 
Add flour enough to make a soft batter, then stir briskly in a 
couple of tablespoonfuls of warm milk in which a Fleischmann's 
Yeast Cake has been dissolved. When light, add two large 
cups of popped corn. This must be of the best (quality, and 
all the hard grains eliminated. Bake at once in muflin rings, 
and eat when warm. 

DOUGHNUTS. 

Two cups of sugar, half a cup of butter, one pint of milk, a 
half teaspoonful of salt, and cinnamon and nutmeg to taste. 

22 



Dissolve a Fleischmann's Yeast Cake in a little warm water ; 
add flour enough to make a firm dough. Set to rise. In the 
morning add three eggs, beaten light, and flour enough to make 
the dough tlie proper consistency. Set to rise again. When 
light, roll into a thick sheet, cut out, and fry in boiling lard. 
Sift powdered sugar over them while hot. 

STRAWBERRY OR RASPBERRY 
SHORT-CAKE. No. i. 

To a quart of sifted flour add a little salt, a heai)ing table- 
spoonful of butter, a teaspoonful of sugar, and a Fleischmann's 
Yeast Cake which has been dissolved in warm milk or water. 
Work into dough with warm milk and set to rise. When light, 
roll into sheets about half an inch thick and let rise again. 
Bake in a quick oven. Sweeten the berries to taste and place 
between the cakes, and on top. Serve with cream. 

STRAWBERRY SHORT-CAKE. No. 2. 

If cream is to be had, dissolve a part of a Fleischmann's 
Yeast Cake in a little warm water, and then add a cup of cream. 
A pint of sifted flour will make a cake large enough for a me- 
dium-sized family. The rule can be enlarged or diminished to 
suit the necessities of the situation. If there is no cream, rub a 
generous half cup of butter into the pint of flour. If there is 
cream, leave out the butter. Add half a cup of sugar, a little 
salt, and set to rise. When light, roll into thin cakes and bake. 
Then butter, and spread the strawberries, which have been 

23 



rolled — not jammed — in powdered sugar. Three i)ints of 
berries are none too much for the pint of Hour. 

IMPERIAL JUMBLES. 

Three cups of powdered sugar, two-thirds of a cup of but- 
ter, a cup of milk, and sifted Hour enough to make an ordinary 
cake batter. Aild part of a Fleischmann's Yeast Cake dis- 
solved in a little warm water, and then stir thoroughl}'. Set 
to rise. When light, add four eggs, which have not been 
beaten, sdrring in one at a dme briskly. Bake in patty pans 
or in large cakes. Success depends upon the beating and 
baking. 

NUT CAKE. 

Thbee cups of light dough, made according to bread rule, 
four eggs, lighdy beaten, two cups of sugar, three-quarters of 
a cup of hickory nuts which have been very carefully cleared 
of the shells. Add the nuts last after a vigorous beating of 
the mixture. Pour into pans and let stand half an hour. Bake 
in a moderate oven. This recipe is perfect for currant or cit- 
ron cake. If currant cake is desired, substitute a cup of this 
fruit, which has been thoroughly washed, dried, and floured. 
If citron cake is wanted, slice a half pound into thin slices, 
flour, and stir in carefully. 

BREAD CAKE. 

To one pint of risen bread dough, made according to rule 
previously given, add half a cup of butter, a coffee cup of 

2i 



sugar, three eggs, well beaten, a pound of stoned raisins, care- 
fully Houred, a little nutmeg, ami sifted Hour enough to make 
a proper cake consistency. Place in pans, let stand fifteen 
minutes and bake very slowly. 

SPICED CAKE. 

To a cup of risen dough, add four eggs, whites and yolks 
beaten separately, half a cup of butter, two cups of sugar, a 
teaspoonful of ground cloves, another of ground i innamon, 
a little nutmeg, and a pound of stoned raisins, well floured. 
Sift in flour enough to make a good batter. Pour into pans 
and let stand Iialf an liour. Bake slowly. 

GOLD CAKE. 

Ox\E coftee cup of sifted flour, a little salt, a part of a Fleisch- 
mann's Yeast Cake dissolved in a little warm water. Make 
into a soft batter with warm milk, and set to rise. When 
light, add a cup and a half of granulated sugar, three-quar- 
ters of a cup of butter, the }olks of five eggs carefully beaten, 
and sifted flour enough to make a good cake batter. Flavor 
with vanilla, f.et stand in pans fifteen minutes, and bake very 

slowly. 

ELECTION CAKE. 

Two coftee cups of sifted flour, a little salt, two-thirds of a 

Fleischmann's Yeast Cake dissolved in a litde warm milk or 

water, and sufticient warm milk to make a soft dough. When 

very light, add one cup of butter, the w^iites and yolks of 

seven eggs, beaten separately ; two coftee cups of sugar, and 



flour enough to make a reliable cake batter. Thep add one 
pound of raisins, one pound of currants, and one pound of 
sliced citron, well floured, one teasjioonful of ground cloves, 
one of cinnamon, half a teaspoonful of maize, and half a pint of 
brandy or wine. Sherry is the best for this purpose. Pour into 
pans and let stand one hour, liake in a moderate oven, slowly. 

CHRISTMAS CAKES. 

To one pint of risen bread dough add two cups of granu- 
lated sugar, one cup of butter, three eggs, whites and yolks 
beaten separately, one teacup of hickory nuts, one great spoon- 
ful of caraway seeds, two cups of stoned raisins, and a little 
grated nutmeg. Cover closely and let stand till light. Pour 
into patty pans and bake slowly. When cool, ice them and 
sift over a few fine candies. 

AUNTIE'S COOKIES. 

One and a half cups of sugar, half a cup of butter, one egg, 
half a Fleischmann's Yeast Cake dissolved in warm water, and 
a teaspoonful of ground cinnamon. Sift in flour enough to 
make a good cake batter. Roll into very thin cakes, cut into 
cookies and bake in a quick oven. 

RISEN ANGEL-CAKE. 

One coffee cup of sifted flour, two-thirds of a Fleischmann's 
Yeast Cake dissolved in warm milk, and warm milk enough to 
make a soft batter. Set to rise. When very light stir in half a 
cup of butter, two cups of confectioners' sugar, and the whites of 
eight eggs, beaten to a stiff froth. Then stir in about two cups 

26 



of sifted flour, and flavor with extract of almond. Pour into 
a pan and let rise till very light. Hake in a slow oven. This 
cake when properly made is most delicious. 

BATTER PUDDING. 

Rub a great spoonful of butter into a pint of sifted flour and 
a litde salt. Dissolve a part of a Fleischmann's Yeast Cake in 
a little warm water. Add warm milk enough to make a mod- 
erately soft batter. Set to rise. When light, add four eggs, the 
yolks and whites beaten separately. Cook in double boiler three- 
quarters of an hour. Serve hot with hard, soft, or cream sauce. 

PEACH POT-PIE. 

This most dehcious dish is made by carefully wiping as many 
peaches as may be desirable, and placing in pot with just 
enough water to cover them. Add sugar according to (juan- 
tity of fruit, ^^'hen l)oiling, cover with a crust which has been 
made from the rule for wheat bread, with the addidon of half a 
cup of butter to a coffee cup of dough. In the whole realm 
of desserts there is nothing more delicious or more easily taken 
care of. A baked pie can be made by peeling, halving, and 
sweetening the i)eaches, and covering with crust in the same 
manner. Half a cup of boiling water is sufficient for this deli- 
cacy. Serve with cream sauce made of butter and sugar. 

SUET PUDDING. 

Take a coffee cup of suet which has been chopped as fine as 
possible, and rub it carefully into a quart of sifted and salted 

27 



flour. Dissolve a ])art of a Fleischmann's Yeast Cake in warm 
water, and stir in with warm milk enoiigli to made a soft batter. 
Let it rise in a warm place. When light, add two well-beaten 
eggs, and boil in a loosely-tied bag an hour and a half. A slm- 
l)le and delicious sauce for this and other i)uddings is made as 
follows : Take one cup of sugar and one egg, beat to frothi- 
ness, and three-quarters of a cup of milk — very hot but not 
boiling — stirred in just before serving. 

BERRY ROLY-POLY. 

If for midday dessert, mix the dough immediately after 
breakfast and set in warm place to rise. Sift two coffee cups of 
flour, add a little salt, and two teaspoonfuls of butter. Rub in 
thoroughly. Dissolve half of a Fleischmann's Yeast Cake in a 
little warm water or milk, and then mix into a soft dough with 
warm milk. When this is light, roll into a long strip and 
spread the berries thickly over it. Sift over them a litde flour. 
Roll carefully, place in a pudding bag or steamer and cook 
three-quarters of an hour. Huckleberries, blackberries, and 
raspberries can be used for this dish ; also sliced ripe peaches. 

PIE-CRUST. 

A HOUSEKEEPER from Maine writes as follows : " I have an 
original recipe for pie-crust, and my family and my neighbors 
pronounce it perfect. For years I had used lard and baking 
powder because the latter gave to the crust a tenderness which 
was very agreeable. But after a while we found that we were 

28 



always uncomfortable, if not really ill, after eating pies made 
in this fashion. So 1 ])Ut my wits to work and evolved the fol- 
lowing : If I wish to make four i)ies I take four meilium-sized 
cu])s of sifted Hour, a teaspoonful of salt, one half cup of 
melted beef suet, one great spoonful of lard and two of butter. 
Then I add half of a Fleischmann's Yeast Cake dissolved in 
a little warm water. Next I rub the shortening carefully into 
the Hour, and then add tej^id water enough to make the 
proper dough. 1 prepare this over night and set in warm 
place to rise. In the morning it is all ready to roll out into 
tender, flaky, delicious crust." 

HARD SAUCE. 

Unk cup of sugar, and half a cup of butter. Beat to a froth 
and flavor with brandy or wine. 

CREAM SAUCE. 

Half a pint of cream, one cuj) of sugar, one teaspoonful of 
vanilla, and one egg. Beat the sugar and egg together, heat 
the cream almost to boiling-point, and add to the sugar and 
egg immediately before serving. If cream is not obtainable, 
milk will do. 

MUGWUMP SAUCE. 

One cup of sugar, half a cup of butter, and one egg. Stir 
all together without having previously beaten the egg. Beat 
till very light. Flavor to taste. Notwithstanding its name 
this is the best sauce made. 

29 



CLAM POT-PIE. 

The clams must be raw, and the cook must be careful that 
they are not gritty. Cut off the black heads and separate the 
bellies from the rest of the clams, and chop the heads and the 
rims. Strain the clam water. P'ry out five or six slices of nice 
fat pork. This will be sufficient for a soHd cjuart of clams. 
When this is done, take out the pork and cut two or three 
onions into the })ork fat. \Vhen there is time it is better to 
chop the onions. When these are cooketl, i)our into a dish, 
and place the slices of pork in the bottom of the pot which is 
to have the honor of holding your pot-pie. Add a layer of the 
onions, a layer of thinly-sliced potatoes, a layer of clams — the 
heads and the rims — then sprinkle in pepper and salt and a 
little flour. Build up in this way until you have used all your 
materials. Then add half a dozen cloves. Fill just to the 
edge with boiling water. Have ready a raised crust, made of a 
scant pint of flour into which a great spoonful of butter has been 
rubbed. Use half of a Fleischmann's Yeast Cake which has been 
dissolved in a litde warm water. The dough should be soft. Raise 
twice as for bread. Roll out, and when the pot is boiling place 
the crust on top, having made a hole in the middle for the escape 
of steam. Cook half an hour. Take off the crust and stir in the 
clam bellies, and let boil a minute longer. Add a little water if 
there is not quite gravy enough, and season to taste. 

ROOT BEER. 

Delicious home-made root beer can be evolved from the 
dried roots found in the drug stores; but if you are in the 

30 



country and can get tlie fresh roots, so much the better. The 
amount and variety of roots depend very much on taste, but 
a good jjropordon is to take equal pans of dandelion and 
yellow dock, half as much sassafras, wintergreen or birch bark 
to flavor, and a little handful of })rince's pine. Boil them 
together, not too long, but just to extract the flavor, strain and 
cool. When lukewarm add a Fleisrhmann's Yeast Cake, and 
sweeten with molasses. Brown sugar may be used if preferred, 
but the molasses seems to have most affinity with the roots. 
Let it stand twenty-four hours, skimming it frequently. Bottle 
tightly. It will be ready to drink in eight or ten days. 



31 



CALENDAR FOR 1890. 

• .J ' • I s ! • I . e ' ■ I I- . h" J 



5 6 



4 
II 

z 12 13^14 15 16 I7|i8 

-, 19 20 I 21 j 22 12.! 2.(125 

26 27|2S 2y 30 31 I . ■ 



2 3 
9 10 1 






3 4 
10! II 

17'ia 
24 25 



9 
16 

23 

13 
20 

27 

4^ 
II 

18 



51 6 
1213 
ig 20 
26 27 



3 4 
10 II 

17 
24 
31 



5 6 
12^13 
ly 20 
26 27 



7I 8 

14 '.T 
21 22 

2S .. 

'71 8 
14 15 
2 1 :.' :; 



28 :: 



9 



7! 
M 
21 

28: 



9 

16 



' 5! 6| 
12 13, 

19 20| 
26 27 



3 
10 

17 
23 24 

^Vii 

7I s: 
14 15 
21 22 

28! 29 



4 1 5 
1 1 1 2 

lu ! I9 
25; 26 



3 

io| 

17 
23 24, 

3f 



,. oi ^ 31 4! 5' 6 
g 8 I 9' io| II 12 13 

D 15 161 I7J 18 19 20 
22 23 ' 24 25 26 27 

29 30 ! . . I 



•J 
< 



o 



7 

14 U 

21' iij 

.8 a 



I 2 3 

C 7 , 8 , 9 10 

13 14 15 16 17 

20 21 22 23 24 

27 28 29 30 31 

3i 4 56 7 
10 II 12 13 14 
17 iS 19 20 21 
24 '2^ 26 27 28 

31:."'..!.. .. 



,1 



, , 3 4 
7 8 [ 9 10 II 

14 15 16 17 18 

21 J2 23 24 25 

28 29 30 . . . . 

••.... I 2 
5! 67 89 

12 13 1415 16 

1 1.,. 202122 23 

26 27 28 ^ 29 30 



21 31 4 S! 6 

9 10 II 12 13 

16 17:181 19 20 

23 i 24 1 25 ^26 27 

30 

2i 3 4 

9 10 II 

15 !i6 17 18 



7 
M 

21 1 22 



4 5 

|ii 12 

18 19 

25 26 

! I 2 

j 8 9 

1 15 16 

22 23 

29 30 



5 ^ 
12 13 

19 20 
26 27 

3 4 
10 II 

17 18 



25 

I 
8 

14 15 
21 22 
28 29 



23 24 25 



20 1 29 130 31 



5 6 
12 13 

19 20 
26; 27